CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

MUSEUM HOURS/TICKETS Exhibition History


1948: The Biennale of Peggy Guggenheim
May 25, 2018–January 14, 2019
Curated by Gražina Subelytė

Projects Rooms



Peggy Guggenheim at the Greek Pavilion, 24th Venice Biennale, where she exhibited her collection, while she arranges Alexander Calder, Arc of Petals (1941); 1948. Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Photo Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche. Gift, Cassa di Risparmio di Venezia, 2005.

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the exhibition of the collection of Peggy Guggenheim in the Greek Pavilion at the 24th Venice Biennale. In order to commemorate this milestone event in the history of 20th-century art, the museum presents an homage exhibition 1948: The Biennale of Peggy Guggenheim. The show will partially recreate the setting of the pavilion through documents, photographs, letters, and for the first time a three-dimensional model of the pavilion installation. The layout had been designed by the distinguished Venetian architect Carlo Scarpa, who collaborated with the Biennale from 1948 to 1972. In 1948 the presentation of the collection offered the European public the opportunity to catch up with the latest artistic developments and to see the New York artists who would dominate the art scene through the 1950s. The present exhibition will therefore offer the opportunity to re-examine this watershed event in Guggenheim’s career and in the history of the Biennale.
EXHIBITION PAGE




Osvaldo Licini: Let Sheer Folly Sweep Me Away
September 22, 2018–January 14, 2019
Curated by Luca Massimo Barbero




Osvaldo Licini, Castello in aria, 1933-1936. Collection Augusto and Francesca Giovanardi

The exhibition will commemorate the 60th anniversary of Osvaldo Licini’s death (1894–1958). In 1958 Licini exhibited 53 works, dating from 1925 to 1958, at the 29th Venice Biennale, in a gallery designed by Carlo Scarpa. Supported by Peggy Guggenheim’s friend and art critic, Giuseppe Marchiori, he was awarded the Grand Prix for Painting. Licini was a major figure in the development of Italian art in the first half of the 20th century. Following his early figurative works, Licini rejected realism and painted fully abstract works. The exhibition will comprise around 80 paintings that will exemplify Licini’s art, made of colors and signs that he viewed as expressions of energy, willpower, ideas, and magic.
EXHIBITION PAGE




credits: Hangar Design Group