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VENICE 1948–1986: THE ART SCENE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE ARCHIVIOARTE FONDAZIONE MODENA
February 5 – May 21, 2006
Curated by Luca Massimo Barbero, the exhibition presents unpublished and remarkable photographs that will take visitors on an extraordinary journey through the artistic milieu of the Venice Biennale from 1948 to 1986, with artists such as Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Salvador Dalí, Emilio Vedova, Lucio Fontana, and Robert Rauschenberg. In their time, these photographs were featured in magazines such as Time and Life. Nowadays, this photo-reportage forms a remarkable contribution to the history of postwar culture. The exhibition features over 150 photographs selected from 12,000 negatives acquired by the ArchivioArte Fondazione—a new project undertaken by the Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Modena—from the Venetian photographic agency Cameraphoto. The exhibition catalogue, published by the Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Modena, includes texts by Luca Massimo Barbero, Sileno Salvagnini, and Enrico Crispolti among others. The exhibition is organized in collaboration with the Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Modena.

HOMAGE TO MARIO NIGRO
April 22 – May 21, 2006
The art of Mario Nigro (Pistoia, 1917–Livorno, 1992), one of the most dedicated protagonists of Italian artistic experiment in the second half of the twentieth century, is presented by curator Luca Massimo Barbero through a small cross-section of his work, with specific attention to the period of the late 1940s to the mid 1960s. Gianni Nigro, President of the Archivio Mario Nigro, generously endorsed the exhibition by donating two paintings in tempera on paper by Mario Nigro that will benefit the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Both of them will be exhibited: Untitled, 1949 (from the Black Panel Series) and Untitled, 1950 (from the Checkered Panels Series), These works indicate the main thrust of the show, which examines the problematics of Nigro’s artistic, conceptual and stylistic research. The exhibition catalogue, published by the Archivio Mario Nigro, includes essays by Gianni Nigro, Germano Celant, and Luca Massimo Barbero. The exhibition is organized in collaboration with the Archivio Mario Nigro, Milan.The programs of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection are made possible by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection Advisory Board, Institutional Patrons and Intrapresæ Collezione Guggenheim.

JEAN-MICHEL OTHONIEL: PEGGY’S NECKLACE
April 29 – May 29, 2006
The installation by Jean-Michel Othoniel consists of seven Murano glass sculptures that will adorn the façade of Palazzo Venier dei Leoni overlooking the Grand Canal. The largest of these takes the form of a necklace. It will be installed the full height of the palazzo and visitors will walk over and through it as they pass from the Grand Canal terrace to the museum galleries. The 9-meter high work will form, with 4 other sculptures, a cross ornamented with multi-colored glass pearls. The installation is made possible by Nicolas Hélion e Emmanuel Perrotin. The programs of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection are made possible by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection Advisory Board, Institutional Patrons and Intrapresæ Collezione Guggenheim.

LUCIO FONTANA: VENICE/NEW YORK
June 4 – September 24, 2006
In 1961, Fontana worked on a group of canvases which constitute an episode of exceptional aesthetic clarity: the Venice series: each canvas measures 1.5 meters square and is remarkable for its thickly layered paint, often punctured or cut, with glass inserts. Their Baroque richness was greeted in 1961 with enthusiasm by a surprised public. In the same year, the Venice series was exhibited at the Martha Jackson Gallery, New York. It was Fontana’s first solo exhibition in the United States, signaling him at once as a new 'master' of the international avant-garde. Fontana was, in turn, fascinated by New York, and while the Venice series was shown there he began sketching the city, which came to form the basis for the metal works he produced upon his return: the New York series. The exhibition catalogue, published by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, comprises essays by Enrico Crispolti, Luca Massimo Barbero, Paolo Campiglio, and Barbara Ferriani. The exhibition traveled to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, from October 10, 2006 to January, 21 2007. The exhibition is organized in collaboration with the Fondazione Lucio Fontana, Milan, and the support of: Regione del Veneto, Istituto nazionale per il Commercio Estero, Banca Aletti, The Murray & Isabella Rayburn Foundation (through the generosity of Maurice Kanbar), Alitalia, and Tratto. The programs of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection are made possible by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection Advisory Board, Institutional Patrons and Intrapresæ Collezione Guggenheim.

LUIGI ONTANI: VETRIETEREIETEROCLITI
September 7 – December 31, 2006
Throughout her life, Peggy Guggenheim demonstrated a certain curiosity with regards to the “dream-like quality” of glass and its myriad artistic applications. The collaboration between the glass masters of Murano and artists such as Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, Max Ernst, and others, was in part inspired and organized by Peggy herself. It took shape in the 1950s stemming from the initiatives of the Fucina degli Angeli studio, and remains even today the clearest and most fruitful testimony of the visions and the potential of glass as a medium. On the wake of this fascination with glass, Luigi Ontani accepted the invitation to exhibit, in Peggy’s bedroom, three new glass sculptures, which were born from his long collaboration with the Murano masters Silvano Signoretto and Romano Donà. The artist has expressed that the presentation of these previously unexhibited works, fruits of a year and a half of work, “is like playing with Peggy’s legend, an attempt to reawaken a dream, in the room designated for dreaming, and to continue to feed it through fantastical and playful visions.” The programs of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection are made possible by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection Advisory Board, Institutional Patrons and Intrapresæ Collezione Guggenheim.

CIAO, IO MI CHIAMO PIETRO TINELLI, MA SE VUOI PUOI CHIAMARMI UCCIO. VIENI ALLA SCOPERTA DEI MIEI MONDI
October 4–15, 2006
curated by the PGC Education Department


GERMAINE RICHIER
October 28, 2006 – February 5, 2007
GERMAINE RICHIER is the first retrospective dedicated to the French sculptor in Italy and marks the return of the artist to the limelight as one of the most important sculptors of the twentieth century. Curated by Luca Massimo Barbero, it is the first comprehensive showing of Richier’s work in Italy, and the first large-scale exhibition anywhere since the 1996 retrospective at the Fondation Maeght. Originated by the presence of an important work by Richier, Tauromachy (1953), in the collection of Peggy Guggenheim, the exhibition presents a selection of almost 70 works, including bronze sculptures, small casts, lithographs and drawings. The show, which extends from the temporary exhibition galleries to the garden, is made possible by the collaboration with the Archives Françoise Guiter in Paris. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, with essays by the Archives Françoise Guiter, Luca Massimo Barbero, and Giorgio Mastinu, which devotes particular attention to the iconographic repertoire of Germain Richier, including photographic prints of the works that Germaine Richier commissioned from Brassaï. The programs of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection are supported by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection Advisory Board, Institutional Patrons and Intrapresæ Collezione Guggenheim.

credits: Hangar Design Group